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Who is Lindsay Mills?

Thank you to the New York Daily News for sending me on an assignment to Waipahu and Mercury Bar to find out more about Lindsay Mills.

See article: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/nsa-leaker-edward-snowden-face-extradition-hong-kong-article-1.1368209

The National Security Agency whistleblower and man all over the news is Edward Snowden. He lived on O‘ahu for a few months until early May, working with the NSA for Booz Allen Hamilton. While his current whereabouts are unknown but are linked to Hong Kong, where he stayed at The Mira hotel for some time until June 10, his girlfriend Lindsay Mills is most likely still in Hawai‘i.

Snowden and Mills lived in a rental home on the corner of Eleu Street in the Royal Kunia neighborhood of Waipahu. They vacated the house May 1. According to the landlord’s realtor Kerri Jo Heim, the landlord used a management company, Kamehameha Realty, to arrange the rental agreements with Snowden. Neighbors all agree that the couple “kept to themselves.” A neighbor directly across the street said he got a call from Washington, D.C., inquiring what he knew about his famous neighbor. Seeing as his phone number is unlisted, the neighbor said, “obviously what [Snowden] is saying must be true.”
We confirmed that Mills is a dancer who practiced with The Waikiki Acrobatic Troupe (WAT), but did not perform with them. “Lindsay had been here at least a year,” a source explained, “I didn’t know her too well … she seemed like a nice person, really cheerful and always wanted to learn.” The troupe holds open recreation nights at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Studio 4, where “there’s a spring floor and they hang aerial stuff.” Mills practiced with aerial silks, pole dancing and duo acrobatics. She reportedly performs at Mercury Bar in downtown Honolulu for monthly First Friday events. The night showcases Pamela and the Pole Kats, a group of dancers who combine pole dancing and acrobatics. As far as Mill’s relationship with Snowden goes, “I don’t think any of us knew she had a boyfriend.” 
 
My one contact person for Lindsay said that Lindsay said she wants privacy right now,” says Terryl Leong, performance coordinator for WAT.
–Jamie Noguchi

Filed under whistleblower edward snowden lindsay mills honolulu weekly

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"I’m concerned with the condition of Hawai‘i’s changing landscape, both natural and built, and political and cultural. I have a conflicting sense of paranoia and optimism for the future of our home that drives me to do the work that I do." // Breaking Ground and Moving Earth

—Sean Connelly, on what inspired him to fill ii gallery with dirt to create A Small Area of Land (Kaka’ako Earth Room).

Filed under Sean Connelly ii gallery A Small Area of Land Honolulu Weekly

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"Some 2.6 million pounds of toxic chemicals were used or generated in Hawai‘i in 2011 by facilities that produce electricity, treat sewage, refine oil into gasoline and train military troops." // Toxic Releases on the Rise
—Joan Conrow on if/how the release of sulfuric acid, nitrates, ammonia and lead might affect our environment.

Photo, Time archives

"Some 2.6 million pounds of toxic chemicals were used or generated in Hawai‘i in 2011 by facilities that produce electricity, treat sewage, refine oil into gasoline and train military troops." // Toxic Releases on the Rise

—Joan Conrow on if/how the release of sulfuric acid, nitrates, ammonia and lead might affect our environment.


Photo, Time archives

Filed under Honolulu Weekly Toxic chemicals Hawaii

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"Since the 1980s—that era of bad taste and cocaine—cocktails have mostly been used to get us from Point A to Drunk. We went for the fast and sweet. If blow brought us up, Long Island Iced Teas, Sexes on the Beach and Tom Cruise in Cocktail took us down. Lather, rinse, repeat. Now, we’ve slowed down. We care about what goes into our bodies. Let what has happened to food in Hawai‘i also elevate the drink with which we whet our appetites.” // Take Me To Your Liquor
—James Cave takes a sip (or six) from each of Honolulu’s craftiest bartenders as they prepare for the inaugural Hawaii Cocktail Week, happening now through Feb. 24.
Photo: Julian Walstrom, bar manager at Salt Bar + Kitchen, pours absinthe the Czech way—with flame.

"Since the 1980s—that era of bad taste and cocaine—cocktails have mostly been used to get us from Point A to Drunk. We went for the fast and sweet. If blow brought us up, Long Island Iced Teas, Sexes on the Beach and Tom Cruise in Cocktail took us down. Lather, rinse, repeat. Now, we’ve slowed down. We care about what goes into our bodies. Let what has happened to food in Hawai‘i also elevate the drink with which we whet our appetites.” // Take Me To Your Liquor

—James Cave takes a sip (or six) from each of Honolulu’s craftiest bartenders as they prepare for the inaugural Hawaii Cocktail Week, happening now through Feb. 24.

Photo: Julian Walstrom, bar manager at Salt Bar + Kitchen, pours absinthe the Czech way—with flame.

Filed under Hawaii Cocktail Week Julian Walstrom Salt Bar and Kitchen absinthe Honolulu Weekly

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"The name Papahānaumokuākea, chosen by Uncle Buzzy Agard and Aunty Pua Kanahele, is a blend of Papahānaumoku, a mother figure symbolizing the earth, and Wākea, a father figure representing the sky." // Grand Food Banks
—Christopher Pala tells the story of Hawai‘i’s Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and reports that it may have implications for ocean conservation worldwide.

"The name Papahānaumokuākea, chosen by Uncle Buzzy Agard and Aunty Pua Kanahele, is a blend of Papahānaumoku, a mother figure symbolizing the earth, and Wākea, a father figure representing the sky." // Grand Food Banks

—Christopher Pala tells the story of Hawai‘i’s Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and reports that it may have implications for ocean conservation worldwide.

Filed under Christopher Pala Papahanaumokuakea Honolulu Weekly marine conservation

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"With its nominees, presenters and drop-in guests dressed down (some in beach wear, others très casual), boozing it up and eager for the wicked (often snarky) entertainment, the show-biz chatter at the Spirit Awards is far more truth-telling than in most televised award pageants. The audience in attendance, often strolling in and out of the tent flaps and then returning sloshed or smoked, seems relaxed and celebratory—and then some." // Alternative Spirit
—Bob Green on why you should watch the 25th Annual Independent Spirit Awards, held on Sat. 2/23 (on IFC), aka the night before the Oscars.
Extra credit: If you really have nothing else better to do, watch last year’s show here.

"With its nominees, presenters and drop-in guests dressed down (some in beach wear, others très casual), boozing it up and eager for the wicked (often snarky) entertainment, the show-biz chatter at the Spirit Awards is far more truth-telling than in most televised award pageants. The audience in attendance, often strolling in and out of the tent flaps and then returning sloshed or smoked, seems relaxed and celebratory—and then some." // Alternative Spirit

—Bob Green on why you should watch the 25th Annual Independent Spirit Awards, held on Sat. 2/23 (on IFC), aka the night before the Oscars.

Extra credit: If you really have nothing else better to do, watch last year’s show here.

Filed under Bob Green Spirit Awards Honolulu Weekly Awards Season IFC

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Out now!! A fresh and crisp HW • Vol. 23, No. 8 // Hawaii set a global standard for marine conservation with the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Is it just a one-off? Also, Ossipoff’s iconic IBM building might get a facelift. What could it look like? Bonobo plays thirtyninehotel, the Brothers Caz go prime time, and after years of little-to-no local comedy, there’s now a stand-up event (nearly) every night of the week. Get um! 

Out now!! A fresh and crisp HW • Vol. 23, No. 8 // Hawaii set a global standard for marine conservation with the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Is it just a one-off? Also, Ossipoff’s iconic IBM building might get a facelift. What could it look like? Bonobo plays thirtyninehotel, the Brothers Caz go prime time, and after years of little-to-no local comedy, there’s now a stand-up event (nearly) every night of the week. Get um! 

Filed under Honolulu Weekly Cover Feb. 20 illustration by Min Jung Otani

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The Once and Future Gnar

There’s no better Honolulu band to become a sweaty mess over than garage-punk Gnarwhal. But we’ve been without singer Erica Westly’s saccharine howl since May, when the guitarist-vocalist moved to San Francisco to be with fish and family—she’s earned two degrees in marine biology from HPU and her grandma’s not getting any younger.

“It’s actually a cool reason to not play music together anymore,” Westly says, comparing Gnarwhal’s pause to other bands’ permanent break ups over creative differences or worse. A band can grow apart for many reasons. But with Gnarwhal, “there were never any problems,” she says. “We were all very sad that I was leaving. I knew I would come out and visit, of course. And it was expected that we would play a show.”

Since Gnarwhal’s not clinically a dead band, Westly says their existence is more a question of where and when. “It’s not really like we’ll never play together again; it’s like we’ll play when we’re all in the same place again. We would still be together if I was still here.”

So what is she doing in a city such as San Francisco? If you know anything about her talent, you know she’s a good fit for the city and is probably in at least six bands already. Not so fast, she says. “I’m not really doing much musically over there, yet. It’s just hard to find people that you jive with. It takes time to break into a new scene. I’m just excited to be back with these dudes. We all had a lot of fun at practice. It should be a lot of fun.”

Westly says that playing with Nick Ayakawa and Adam Funari puts her where she needs to be. “I feel like playing with them [at practice] last night was like home; I feel right again, like a normal person again. I feel like myself again,” she says, quickly adding, “We haven’t played since May, though. Let’s keep the expectations low, alright?”

The doors to Gnarwhal’s return open at 9pm. Blood Cave, Red Rocket and Siblings are also scheduled to perform. // —James Cave.

Mercury Bar, 1154 Fort St. Mall, Thu., 1/31, 9pm, $3 suggested donation at the door

Photograph of Gnarwhal, by Michael Keany

Filed under Gnarwhal Honolulu Weekly Siblings Blood Cave Red Rocket Mercury Bar

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iiiiin the box! // What’s on the docket for the State Leg and City Council, and how can you get in on the action? The Weekly breaks it down; The Punahou Carnival makes a comeback, and this time there’s a #; Don Wallace, our film editor and tamale aficionado, tells you where to find los mejores tamales (yes, they’re on O’ahu).

iiiiin the box! // What’s on the docket for the State Leg and City Council, and how can you get in on the action? The Weekly breaks it down; The Punahou Carnival makes a comeback, and this time there’s a #; Don Wallace, our film editor and tamale aficionado, tells you where to find los mejores tamales (yes, they’re on O’ahu).

Filed under honolulu weekly out now

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Scott’s Honor

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This week, Scott Caan went viral in Hawaii. I know we don’t like Caan with “virus” in the same thought, but his appearance on E! Networks’ Cheslea Lately riled up a lot of my friends. I can understand why, but really—it’s Caan, an actor who gets overpaid to live in Hawaii for playing a whining character on a show that exaggerates crime in Hawaii. Why are we surprised and, more importantly, why do we care? 

Hawaii residents are proud of their state, with good reason, but it’s good to remember that not all people in the world love it here. I do, but I chose to be here. Sure the island and I have our fights, but we still end up loving each other at the end of the night and our makeup sex is quite good. But anyone relocated here for work, such as actors, sometimes don’t like it here. Sometimes they say it out loud. What’s wrong with that?

It’s an overreaction for people to say, “He’s making us look bad,” “He should watch his back” once he returns, “He should quit” the show if he doesn’t like it here (see the comment threads here and here). In the clip, Caan limply comments on our island pace, already an old joke, and our meth issues, which, although ignorantly paraphrased by both Caan and Chelsea Handler, still exist. Chelsea Lately is a talk show hosted by a comedienne. It’s not a news outlet. These things get said, especially on her show, which—if you’ve ever watched it outside of this clip you already know—gets a lot more ignorant.

Scottergate isn’t anything more than a PR problem between Caan and his publicist. If we get so upset by this guy, we’re inherently giving him too much credit. Are we even going to remember him after Five-0?

—James Cave is the Arts & Culture editor. Reach him at jamescave@honoluluweekly.com

Filed under James Cave Scottergate Honolulu Weekly Chelsea Lately Chelsea Handler